Addressing Astronomy Misconceptions And Achieving National Science Standards Utilizing Aspects Of Multiple Intelligences Theory In The Classroom And The Planetarium

Sarrazine, Angela Renee (2005) Addressing Astronomy Misconceptions And Achieving National Science Standards Utilizing Aspects Of Multiple Intelligences Theory In The Classroom And The Planetarium. Doctoral thesis, Indiana University.

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to incorporate multiple intelligences techniques in both a classroom and planetarium setting to create a significant increase in student learning about the moon and lunar phases. Utilizing a freeresponse questionnaire and a 25 item multiple choice pre-test/post-test design, this study identified middle school students’ misconceptions and measured increases in student learning about the moon and lunar phases. The study spanned two semesters and contained six treatment groups which consisted of both single and multiple interventions. One group only attended the planetarium program. Two groups attended one of two classes a week prior to the planetarium program, and two groups attended one of two classes a week after the planetarium program. The most rigorous treatment group attended a class both a week before and after the planetarium program. Utilizing Rasch analysis techniques and parametric statistical tests, all six groups exhibited statistically significant gains in knowledge at the 0.05 level. There were no significant differences between students who attended only a planetarium program versus a single classroom program. Also, subjects who attended either a pre-planetarium class or a post-planetarium class did not show a statistically significant gain over the planetarium only situation. Equivalent effects on student learning were exhibited by the pre-planetarium class groups and post-planetarium class groups. Therefore, it was determined that the placement of the second vi intervention does not have a significant impact on student learning. However, a decrease in learning was observed with the addition of a third intervention. Further instruction and testing appeared to hinder student learning. This is perhaps an effect of subject fatigue.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: Astronomy Education Research
Depositing User: Users 1 not found.
Date Deposited: 02 Apr 2017 04:25
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2018 09:11
URI: http://istardb.org/id/eprint/283

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