What It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Change

Krumenaker, Larry (2010) What It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Change. Astronomy Education Review, 9 (1).

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Abstract

"A survey to principals of high schools without astronomy points to the conditions needed to increase the number of high school astronomy courses and acceptable justifications for adding in a course. The former includes the need for more and better trained teachers, changing the perceptions of higher officials from local administrations to Federal-level legislators and education department officials, more funds, locally a need for students to show enough interest as well as a curriculum that helps with high stakes testing and Adequate Yearly Progress AYP scoring. Good reasons for having a course include helping increase options for students needing science electives or fourth year courses, and astronomy reinforces prior learning that helps raise AYP scores and increases student interest in science with material not taught in other courses. Some inhibiting influences include the timing of the course is usually after AYP testing, standards may not exist or limit new electives, and a dearth of astronomy teachers locally. Results of this study include a list of competing electives, typical procedures and a prescription for adding in courses."

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Astronomy Education Research
Depositing User: Dr Michael Fitzgerald
Date Deposited: 22 Mar 2017 10:50
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2018 09:25
URI: http://istardb.org/id/eprint/58

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